2018 First Semester Poverty Statistics among Families in ARMM

April 17, 2019Special Release Ref No.: SR-ARMM-19-010

Poverty and Food Thresholds 

In the first semester of 2018, ARMM recorded a per capita poverty threshold of PhP13,578 and per capita food threshold of PhP9,565. This means that a person in ARMM needed at least PhP13,578, on the average, to buy his or her basic food and non-food needs for one semester or six months, or PhP2,263 for one month. On the other hand, a person needs at least PhP9,565, on the average, to meet his or her basic food needs for one semester or six months, that is PhP1,594 for one month. On the average, a family of five needed at least Php11,315 to meet their basic food and non-food needs; and at least PhP7,970 to meet their basic food needs only. 

Figures 1 and 2 show that ARMM ranked 2nd in the entire country in terms of per capita poverty and food thresholds, next to NCR and followed by Region IV-A. 

Figure 1.  First Semester per Capita Poverty Threshold (in PhP) in Philippines, by Region: 2015 and 2018  
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

 

Figure 2.  First Semester per Capita Food Threshold (in PhP) in Philippines, by Region: 2015 and 2018   
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

Lanao del Sur recorded the highest per capita poverty and food thresholds in ARMM recorded at PhP14,769 and PhP10,312 in the first semester of 2018, respectively, as shown in Figures 3 and 4. This was followed by Sulu, Basilan and Maguindanao with per capita poverty thresholds of PhP13,830, PhP12,671, and PhP12,653, respectively; and corresponding per capita food thresholds of PhP9,663, PhP8,846 and PhP8,838. On the other hand, Tawi-Tawi has the lowest per capita poverty and food thresholds estimated at PhP9,817 and PhP6,847, respectively. 

To get the poverty and food thresholds for a family of five, you just have to divide the per capita threshold for a semester to get the per person per month threshold, then multiply it by five to get the threshold per family of five per month. 

Figure 3.  First Semester per Capita Poverty Threshold (in PhP) in ARMM, by Province: 2015 and 2018   
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

 

Figure 4.  First Semester per Capita Food Threshold (in PhP) in ARMM, by Province: 2015 and 2018   
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

Poverty Incidence among Families in ARMM 

Figure 5 shows that ARMM recorded the highest poverty incidence among families in the first semesters of 2015 and 2018. More than half or 55.4 percent of the families in the region are considered poor in the first semester of 2018. This is 1.42 percentage points lower than the poverty incidence among families in the first semester of 2015.

Figure 5.  First Semester Poverty Incidence among Families (%) in Philippines, by Region: 2015 and 2018    
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

Families in Lanao del Sur, Sulu and Basilan are the poorest in the region, as well as in the entire country, in the first semester of 2018, as shown in Figure 6. The poverty threshold among population in these provinces were estimated at 68.0 percent, 65.8 percent and 65.3 percent, respectively. 

Poverty incidence among families in Basilan, Tawi-Tawi and Maguindanao increased by corresponding percentage points of 36.49, 6.34 and 0.52; while that of Sulu and Lanao del Sur decreased by 5.91 and 5.80 percentage points, respectively, between the first semesters of 2015 and 2018.  

Figure 6.  First Semester Poverty Incidence among Families (%) in ARMM, by Province: 2015 and 2018     
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

Subsistence Incidence among Population in ARMM

Figure 7 shows that ARMM recorded the highest subsistence incidence among families in the entire country both in the first semesters of 2015 and 2018. About 29.1 percent of the families in the region are food poor. This is 0.24 percentage point higher than the subsistence incidence among families in the first semester of 2015. 

Families in Lanao del Sur, Basilan and Sulu are the poorest in the region, and belong to the top 5 poorest cities/municipalities in the entire country, in the first semester of 2018, as shown in Figure 8. The subsistence incidence among families in these provinces were estimated at 41.6 percent, 36.5 percent and 29.0 percent, respectively.

Subsistence incidence among families in Basilan, Maguindanao and Tawi-Tawi increased by corresponding percentage points of 30.43, 4.41 and 3.09; while estimates in Lanao del Sur and Sulu decreased by 9.04 and 3.25 percentage points, respectively. 

Figure 7.  First Semester Subsistence Incidence among Families (%) in Philippines, by Region: 2015 and 2018     
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1

 

Figure 8.  First Semester Subsistence Incidence among Families (%) in ARMM, by Province: 2015 and 2018     
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, Family Income and Expenditure Survey Visit 1
Notes:
  • Coefficient of variation of provincial poverty incidence among population is greater than 20%.
  • Food Thresholds are estimated using actual prices collected by PSA for the estimation of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In consonance with the updating of the market basket for the collection of prices for CPI, First Semester 2015 Poverty Statistics were revised accordingly.

Glossary of Terms Used:

Food Threshold – the minimum income required for a family/individual to meet the basic food needs, which satisfies the nutritional requirements for economically necessary and socially desirable physical activities. 

Poverty Incidence – the proportion of families/individuals with per capita income less than the per capita threshold to the number of families/individuals. 

Poverty Threshold – the minimum income required for a family/individual to meet the basic food and non-food requirements.

Notes: Basic food requirements are currently based on 100% adequacy for the Recommended Energy and Nutrient Intake (RENI) for protein and energy equivalent to an average 2000 kilocalories per capita, and 80% adequacy for other nutrients. On the other hand, basic non-food requirements, indirectly estimated by obtaining the ratio of food to total basic expenditures from a reference group of families, cover expenditure on: 1) clothing and footwear 2) housing; 3) fuel. Light, water; 4) maintenance and minor repairs; 5) rental of occupied dwelling units; 6) medical care; 7) education; 8) transportation and communication; 9) non-durable furnishings; 10) household operations; and 11) personal care & effects.

Subsistence Incidence – the proportion of families/individuals with per capita income less than the per capita food threshold to the total number of families/individuals. 

 

(Sgd) HJI. RAZULDEN A. MANGELEN, MPA, MDM
(Chief Statistical Specialist)
Officer-in-Charge
RSSO-ARMM